Thursday, October 31, 2013

From the Archives: Part 67 of The Self and its Sources




Girard’s sources & precursors: Homer, Shakespeare, novels, the Bible

György Lukács' essay: ‘Ideology of Modernism’

Bronislaw Malinovski: Desire and counter desire

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

From the Archives: Part 63 of The Self and its Sources




Deconstruction: To extricate ourselves from the past is a bourgeois idea of liberty that is still very much at work in modern theory. Simone Weil had a hunger for determination

Monday, October 21, 2013

From the Archives: Part 62 of The Self and its Source




The scene of the boys entering the school chapel: Lewis (the T S Eliot character) in procession, rejoices.

Saturday, October 19, 2013

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

From the Archives: Part 59 of The Self and its Sources




The wave as a gesture of departure - leaving the past (childhood) behind and moving into the future diaspora.

Composure: How to be in the presence of others without being drawn into mimetic entanglements.

Sunday, October 13, 2013

From the Archives: Part 58 of The Self and its Sources




The Biblical image of ‘pairs’ or doubles: e.g. Adam & Eve, Cain & Able

Friday, October 11, 2013

From the Archives: Part 57 of The Self and its Sources




The consequences of this mimetic drama begin spreading like ripples on water...like waves.

Wednesday, October 09, 2013

"Abortion has been called 'atheism in action;' contraception, the doorway to abortion, should be called 'the denial of Divine Providence in action." - Anne Barbeau Gardiner, Professor Emerita, John Jay College of the City University of New York.

From the Archives: Part 56 of The Self and its Sources




The children are in the garden. The plot begins with one spontaneous expression of desire, Jinny comes dashing by and kisses Lewis…, which sets the whole mimetic dynamic in motion. This event is surreptitiously viewed by Susan. The Fall...

Saturday, October 05, 2013

From the Archives: Part 54 of The Self and its Sources




Virginia Woolf introduces each section of the novel with an italizied phrase referring to the position of the sun in the sky. Section one: "The sun had not quite risen; the sea and sky were indistinguishable." Mythological imagery. The sun comes up…its light striking the leaves in the garden making them transparent.

Thursday, October 03, 2013

From the Archives: Part 53 of The Self and its Sources




The dramatis personae of the Waves. The story is comprised of a series of internal monologs of a strange kind. The more you know about a character’s internal life it seems the more undifferentiated they appear to every other character.

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

From the Archives: Part 52 of The Self and its Sources




"The Moths" or "The Waves" – alternative titles to novel.

The moth drawn to the flame; drawn to the light but not so close as to be destroyed. The Waves – crashing on the shore, one following the other in endless repetition.