Monday, January 31, 2011

from the Archives: Famished Craving - Part 28

With this post a new session (the 5th tape) from the 1995 Famished Craving series begins. Over the next three posts Gil is offering a preamble to an exploration of a then current (January 1995) New York Times article that he believed was a particularly graphic example of what he was attempting to expose in his exploration of 'fame'. He also provides a summary review of the modern crisis as seen through the lens of Rene Girard as a foundation for the analysis of the N Y Times article.












Thursday, January 27, 2011

from the Archives: Famished Craving - Part 27

Gil Bailie on Biblical personhood:

...I would say that the hypostatic subjectivity comes by its ontological density honestly….it is received as a gift (cf St. Paul re justification) a synonym for dignity...















The following book is referenced in this excerpt:

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

from the Archives: Famished Craving - Part 26

The existential experience of being on the "cutting edge"....

Lurking behind every chance to be made whole by fame is the ax man of further dismembering
Leo Braudy, The Frenzy of Renown














Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Thursday, January 13, 2011

from the Archives: Famished Craving - Part 22

From the 18th century until now there has been a close relationship between the desire for fame and the uncertainty about personal identity - Leo Braudy













Sunday, January 09, 2011

Thursday, January 06, 2011

from the Archives: Famished Craving - Part 20

“The ignorance of what fame means and what it can bring may itself be a hallmark of our modern age.....Only with the modern frenzy of renown have so many appeared with so little or no comprehension of the contract of eyes and attention by which the audience and the fame seeker balance their desires.”

Leo Braudy - The Frenzy of Renown













Tuesday, January 04, 2011

from the Archives: Famished Craving - Part 19

The modern world's experience of desacralization - getting rid of vestiges of the old sacred system without providing a renewed religious foundation for its culture, underlie the modern crisis.